Anorgasmia

What's the scoop?

 

Female anorgasmia, also called female orgasmic disorder, is when a woman is often not able to have an orgasm or takes a very long time to reach an orgasm even with a normal level of sexual activity.

 

Anorgasmia can be difficult to diagnose, so usually a doctor will monitor the stress and difficulty it causes the relationship to give the diagnosis.

 

Can there be different types?

 

There are a variety of type of female orgasmic disorder ranging from lifelong or beginning at a certain stage in life, as well as ocurring at all times or only occuring in certain situations.

An example of this is seeing if a female is able to have an orgasm from self masturbation or stimulation but cannot during sex with a partner.

 

Because of these differences, anorgasmia is broken into two sub-types:

  • primary anorgasmia, describing lifelong and generalized trouble
  • secondary anorgasmia, describing acquired and situational anorgasmia

 

The disorder is pretty common with around 18-29% of women reporting anorgasmia. Many women have trouble from reaching climax from vaginal sex alone, and it is common to require stimulation at the opening of the vagina near the clitoris.

 

 

What's the scoop?

 

Female anorgasmia, also called female orgasmic disorder, is when a woman is often not able to have an orgasm or takes a very long time to reach an orgasm even with a normal level of sexual activity.

 

Anorgasmia can be difficult to diagnose, so usually a doctor will monitor the stress and difficulty it causes the relationship to give the diagnosis.

 

Can there be different types?

 

There are a variety of type of female orgasmic disorder ranging from lifelong or beginning at a certain stage in life, as well as ocurring at all times or only occuring in certain situations.

Anorgasmia

An example of this is seeing if a female is able to have an orgasm from self masturbation or stimulation but cannot during sex with a partner.

 

Because of these differences, anorgasmia is broken into two sub-types:

  • primary anorgasmia, describing lifelong and generalized trouble
  • secondary anorgasmia, describing acquired and situational anorgasmia

 

The disorder is pretty common with around 18-29% of women reporting anorgasmia. Many women have trouble from reaching climax from vaginal sex alone, and it is common to require stimulation at the opening of the vagina near the clitoris.

 

 

Symptom list:

Anorgasmia