Bladder Cancer

What's the scoop?

 

Bladder cancer is a common cancer which originates in the bladder where pee (urine) is stored after the kidneys filter the blood.

 

The bladder is hollow with muscular walls to allow it to get larger and smaller when urine enters or exits the area.

 

Cancer of the bladder starts on the inside layer where the urothelial cells are and then moves out to the muscular walls. Urothelial cells are also located in the tubes that connect the kidney to the bladder, but cancer is much less common there.

Are there different types?

 

The four types of bladder cancer are

  • urothelial cell
  • squamous cell
  • ademocarcinoma
  • urothelial cell carcinomas of the upper tract

 

 

There are a few other types of bladder cancer but they are extremely rare, so we will not be referencing them here.

 

90% of all bladder cancers are urothelial cells. These types of bladder cancers can also be divided into categories called

  • non muscle-invasve bladder cancer (cancer is only in inner lining of bladder)
  • muscle-invasive bladder cancer (cancer has spread to muscle around bladder)
  • metastatic bladder cancer (cancer has spread to nearby lymph nodes and other areas of body)

 

Who's more at risk?

 

There are some major risk factors for bladder cancer with a large one being a tobacco user. Those who smoke tobacco are 2-3 times more likely to get bladder cancer. Bladder cancer is also more common in caucasian men than any other group.

 

Treatment

 

Treatment options will also depend on the grade of bladder cancer which can either be low-grade or high-grade. Low-grade bladder cancer grows slower and is less likely to spread to the muscle, whereas high-grade tends to be more aggressive and therefore faster growing.

 

Types of treatment for bladder cancer include

 

Bladder cancer is usually detected early and is highly treatable. However, it also has a high chance of reocurring (50-80%). Even though these numbers are high, still 77% of bladder cancer patients survive at least five years after being diagnosed.

 

What's the scoop?

 

Bladder cancer is a common cancer which originates in the bladder where pee (urine) is stored after the kidneys filter the blood.

 

The bladder is hollow with muscular walls to allow it to get larger and smaller when urine enters or exits the area.

 

Cancer of the bladder starts on the inside layer where the urothelial cells are and then moves out to the muscular walls. Urothelial cells are also located in the tubes that connect the kidney to the bladder, but cancer is much less common there.

Bladder Cancer

Are there different types?

 

The four types of bladder cancer are

  • urothelial cell
  • squamous cell
  • ademocarcinoma
  • urothelial cell carcinomas of the upper tract

 

 

There are a few other types of bladder cancer but they are extremely rare, so we will not be referencing them here.

 

90% of all bladder cancers are urothelial cells. These types of bladder cancers can also be divided into categories called

  • non muscle-invasve bladder cancer (cancer is only in inner lining of bladder)
  • muscle-invasive bladder cancer (cancer has spread to muscle around bladder)
  • metastatic bladder cancer (cancer has spread to nearby lymph nodes and other areas of body)

 

Who's more at risk?

 

There are some major risk factors for bladder cancer with a large one being a tobacco user. Those who smoke tobacco are 2-3 times more likely to get bladder cancer. Bladder cancer is also more common in caucasian men than any other group.

 

Treatment

 

Treatment options will also depend on the grade of bladder cancer which can either be low-grade or high-grade. Low-grade bladder cancer grows slower and is less likely to spread to the muscle, whereas high-grade tends to be more aggressive and therefore faster growing.

 

Types of treatment for bladder cancer include

 

Bladder cancer is usually detected early and is highly treatable. However, it also has a high chance of reocurring (50-80%). Even though these numbers are high, still 77% of bladder cancer patients survive at least five years after being diagnosed.

 

Symptom list:

Bladder Cancer