Bone Cancer

What is it?

 

Bone cancer is a rare cancer that only makes up 0.2% of cancers in the United States. While it can start in any bone in the body, usually begins in the pelvic region or in the large bones that make up the arms and the legs.

 

Other cancers may affect the bones as well, however they start in other parts of the body and grow (metastasize) into the bones.

 

There are different types

 

The main types of bone cancers are:

  • osteosarcoma
  • chondrosarcoma
  • Ewing's sarcoma

 

Osteosarcoma is the most common bone cancer among children and adolescents, and it also makes up 25% of bone cancer in adults, making it the most common bone cancer overall. In osteosarcoma the cancerous cells produce additional bone, however in rare cases it can form outside the bone.

 

Chondrosarcoma develops in the cartilage cells (cells of the elastic tissue that connects bones). This is the most common bone cancer among adults with the majority of cases being diagnosed in people over the age of 40. In a lot of cases chondrosarcoma tumors are benign (non-cancerous), however even if they turn out to be malignant (cancerous), they are usually caught in an early stage and are slow growing.

 

Ewing's sarcoma is the second most common in children and young people and makes up for 8% of adult bone cancers.

 

Other less common bone cancers include chordomas, maligant fibrous histiocytomas/fibrosarcomas, fibrosarcomas, and secondary bone cancer.

 

How can I find out if I have it?

 

To diagnose bone cancer the doctor might do a bone scan, CT scan, MRI scan, or PET scan. They might also choose to do a biopsy of the tissue for futher testing. It's very important that if the doctor chooses to do a biopsy that they do it in a way that doesn't interfere with future surgeries, so it's essential to get referred by a professional with experience in bone cancers.

 

I have it, now what?

 

Based on the type of bone cancer that someone is diagnosed with, the treatment plan might include surgery, chemotherapy, radiation, or a combination.

 

What is it?

 

Bone cancer is a rare cancer that only makes up 0.2% of cancers in the United States. While it can start in any bone in the body, usually begins in the pelvic region or in the large bones that make up the arms and the legs.

 

Other cancers may affect the bones as well, however they start in other parts of the body and grow (metastasize) into the bones.

 

There are different types

 

The main types of bone cancers are:

  • osteosarcoma
  • chondrosarcoma
  • Ewing's sarcoma
Bone Cancer

 

Osteosarcoma is the most common bone cancer among children and adolescents, and it also makes up 25% of bone cancer in adults, making it the most common bone cancer overall. In osteosarcoma the cancerous cells produce additional bone, however in rare cases it can form outside the bone.

 

Chondrosarcoma develops in the cartilage cells (cells of the elastic tissue that connects bones). This is the most common bone cancer among adults with the majority of cases being diagnosed in people over the age of 40. In a lot of cases chondrosarcoma tumors are benign (non-cancerous), however even if they turn out to be malignant (cancerous), they are usually caught in an early stage and are slow growing.

 

Ewing's sarcoma is the second most common in children and young people and makes up for 8% of adult bone cancers.

 

Other less common bone cancers include chordomas, maligant fibrous histiocytomas/fibrosarcomas, fibrosarcomas, and secondary bone cancer.

 

How can I find out if I have it?

 

To diagnose bone cancer the doctor might do a bone scan, CT scan, MRI scan, or PET scan. They might also choose to do a biopsy of the tissue for futher testing. It's very important that if the doctor chooses to do a biopsy that they do it in a way that doesn't interfere with future surgeries, so it's essential to get referred by a professional with experience in bone cancers.

 

I have it, now what?

 

Based on the type of bone cancer that someone is diagnosed with, the treatment plan might include surgery, chemotherapy, radiation, or a combination.

 

Symptom list:

Bone Cancer