Brain Cancer

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Brain tumors are like other tumors in your body defined as a mass or a growth of abnormal cells. There are many types of brain tumors that can be either benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous).

 

Similarly, tumors in the brain can either be slowly growing and show no symptoms for a while, or fast growing with a sudden onset of symptoms.

 

While usually benign brain tumors are slower growing, because there is not much room to expand in the brain, they can cause a lot of trouble by pressing on parts of the brain, spine, or spinal cord.

Cancerous Brain Tumors

 

Amongst the brain tumors that are cancerous, there are those that originate in the brain and those that spread to the brain after they start in a different part of the body.

 

Depending on the type of brain tumor that you're diagnosed with, the treatment of the tumor and the symptoms presented will be different.

 

Who's more at risk?

 

On average more men than women are diagnosed with brain cancer, however more women are diagnosed with meningiomas (a type of brain cancer) than men.

 

What are the types?

 

The main types of brain cancer include

  • gliomas
  • hemangioblastomas
  • medulloblastomas
  • meningiomas
  • pineal gland tumors
  • pituitary tumors
  • sarcomas

 

Under gliomas there are subsets including

  • astrocytomas
  • ependymomas
  • oligodengrogliomas

 

Many of the above can also be non-cancerous. There are also other non-cancerous brain tumors that are not listed above that might require surgery.

 

Out of the cancers that might start elsewhere and move to the brain, the most common ones are

  • breast cancer
  • colon cancer
  • kidney cancer
  • lung cancer
  • melanoma (usually skin cancer)

 

I have it. Now what?

 

The normal treatment for brain cancer might include surgery, radiation, chemotherapy, and immunotherapy. This will depend on the type of brain cancer, the size of the tumor, and where it is located because each case is different and will have different specific needs.

 

It's advised to see a doctor if someone has continual symptoms such as new and frequent headaches, new severe headaches, nausea or vomiting, vision problems, memory problems, weakness or numbness on one side of the body, seizures, general confusion, hearing difficulties, and personality changes.

 

 

Talk to me.

 

Brain tumors are like other tumors in your body defined as a mass or a growth of abnormal cells. There are many types of brain tumors that can be either benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous).

 

Similarly, tumors in the brain can either be slowly growing and show no symptoms for a while, or fast growing with a sudden onset of symptoms.

 

While usually benign brain tumors are slower growing, because there is not much room to expand in the brain, they can cause a lot of trouble by pressing on parts of the brain, spine, or spinal cord.

Brain Cancer

Cancerous Brain Tumors

 

Amongst the brain tumors that are cancerous, there are those that originate in the brain and those that spread to the brain after they start in a different part of the body.

 

Depending on the type of brain tumor that you're diagnosed with, the treatment of the tumor and the symptoms presented will be different.

 

Who's more at risk?

 

On average more men than women are diagnosed with brain cancer, however more women are diagnosed with meningiomas (a type of brain cancer) than men.

 

What are the types?

 

The main types of brain cancer include

  • gliomas
  • hemangioblastomas
  • medulloblastomas
  • meningiomas
  • pineal gland tumors
  • pituitary tumors
  • sarcomas

 

Under gliomas there are subsets including

  • astrocytomas
  • ependymomas
  • oligodengrogliomas

 

Many of the above can also be non-cancerous. There are also other non-cancerous brain tumors that are not listed above that might require surgery.

 

Out of the cancers that might start elsewhere and move to the brain, the most common ones are

  • breast cancer
  • colon cancer
  • kidney cancer
  • lung cancer
  • melanoma (usually skin cancer)

 

I have it. Now what?

 

The normal treatment for brain cancer might include surgery, radiation, chemotherapy, and immunotherapy. This will depend on the type of brain cancer, the size of the tumor, and where it is located because each case is different and will have different specific needs.

 

It's advised to see a doctor if someone has continual symptoms such as new and frequent headaches, new severe headaches, nausea or vomiting, vision problems, memory problems, weakness or numbness on one side of the body, seizures, general confusion, hearing difficulties, and personality changes.

 

 

Symptom list:

Brain Cancer