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Broken wrist

What is a Broken Wrist?

A broken wrist, also known as a wrist fracture, occurs when one or more of the bones in your wrist are cracked or broken. This can happen due to a fall, a sports injury, or any other accident that puts pressure on the wrist. When you have a broken wrist, you may experience pain, swelling, bruising, and difficulty moving your hand and wrist.



Diagnosing a Broken Wrist

If you suspect you have a broken wrist, it is important to see a doctor for a proper diagnosis. The doctor will examine your wrist, ask about the injury, and may order an X-ray to confirm the fracture. X-rays can show the exact location and severity of the break, helping the doctor determine the best course of treatment.



Treating a Broken Wrist

Treatment for a broken wrist depends on the type and severity of the fracture. In some cases, a cast or splint may be applied to immobilize the wrist and allow the bones to heal. If the fracture is more severe, surgery may be required to realign the bones and stabilize them with pins, plates, or screws. After treatment, physical therapy may be recommended to regain strength and mobility in the wrist.



Preventing a Broken Wrist

While accidents can happen, there are some preventive measures you can take to reduce the risk of a broken wrist. Always wear protective gear, such as wrist guards, when participating in sports or activities that involve a risk of falling. Be cautious when walking on slippery surfaces and use handrails for support. Avoid putting excessive pressure on your wrists during activities and try to maintain good overall bone health through a balanced diet and regular exercise.



What is a Broken Wrist?

A broken wrist, also known as a wrist fracture, occurs when one or more of the bones in your wrist are cracked or broken. This can happen due to a fall, a sports injury, or any other accident that puts pressure on the wrist. When you have a broken wrist, you may experience pain, swelling, bruising, and difficulty moving your hand and wrist.



Diagnosing a Broken Wrist

If you suspect you have a broken wrist, it is important to see a doctor for a proper diagnosis. The doctor will examine your wrist, ask about the injury, and may order an X-ray to confirm the fracture. X-rays can show the exact location and severity of the break, helping the doctor determine the best course of treatment.



Treating a Broken Wrist

Treatment for a broken wrist depends on the type and severity of the fracture. In some cases, a cast or splint may be applied to immobilize the wrist and allow the bones to heal. If the fracture is more severe, surgery may be required to realign the bones and stabilize them with pins, plates, or screws. After treatment, physical therapy may be recommended to regain strength and mobility in the wrist.



Preventing a Broken Wrist

While accidents can happen, there are some preventive measures you can take to reduce the risk of a broken wrist. Always wear protective gear, such as wrist guards, when participating in sports or activities that involve a risk of falling. Be cautious when walking on slippery surfaces and use handrails for support. Avoid putting excessive pressure on your wrists during activities and try to maintain good overall bone health through a balanced diet and regular exercise.



Graphic representation of Broken wrist

Symptom list:

Broken wrist

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Financial support

Not all of us are able to afford the treatment we need. Search your insurance coverage, or check out what charities may be able to offer you for your condition.

p.s. Just because you have insurance, that doesn't mean that charities or other organizations are not able to support you too.

Emotional support

Whether it's a free counseling session or to find someone with a similar diagnosis, these Germie approved charities might be able to help. Click to explore their offerings!

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Sources:

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