Chondrosarcoma

Sound familiar?

 

Chondrosarcoma may be more commonly known as a type of bone cancer. However, while chondrosarcoma often starts in the bones, it can also begin in the soft tissue near bones such as the pelvis, hip or shoulder.

 

Chondrosarcoma is typically slow growing and may not present any symptoms, however when it does present symptoms, you might experience one or more of the below listed under the symptoms.

 

Who's most likely to get it?

People who are 50+ are more likely to be diagnosed with chondrosarcoma, however that does not mean that young people can't be diagnosed with the cancer.

 

Other risk factors include people who have other bone diseases. Some bone diseases can cause benign bone growths, or lumps, that can sometimes turn into chondrosarcoma later in life.

 

Diagnosis & Treatment

 

If a doctor suspects that you may have chondrosarcoma, she will probably order an imaging scan of the suspected area such as an X-ray, MRI or CT scan.

 

If this comes back suspicious, she may take a tissue sample (biopsy) of the area in question to test for cancerous cells. Depending on the area, a biopsy to test for chondrosarcoma can be difficult to do, so make sure that you have a specialist doing the sample.

 

Like most cancers, chondrosarcoma treatment will depend on where the cancer is, how quickly it is growing and if it has spread.

 

The three main treatments for chondrosarcoma are

  • surgery
  • chemotherapy
  • radiation

 

Surgery

 

Surgery for chondrosarcoma can be tricky with the bone. Sometimes the doctors are able to scrape away the cancer cells from the bone and replace the area that has been scrapped away with something called a bone graft or something called bone cement.

 

If scrapping isn't enough to remove the cancer, the surgeon may need to remove part of the affected bone where the cancer is, or remove an entire limb. Depending on how much has been cut away from the surgery, the surgeon may be able to replace or reconstruct the area where the bone has been removed i order to save the limb.

 

Chemotherapy & Radiation

 

While chemotherapy is mentioned as a type of treatment for chondrosarcoma, it is rare that it will be used because most chondrosarcomas are slow growing and do not respond to chemotherapy. However, if you have a rare case in which the chondrosarcoma is fast-growing, chemotherapy will be an encouraged form of treatment.

 

Radiation will most likely be used if your medical team thinks that they are unable to reach the cancer through surgery. Similarly, if the cancer has spread beyond the bone to other areas of the body, the doctor may suggest targeting these areas with radiation to ensure that they remove all cancer from the body.

 

Sound familiar?

 

Chondrosarcoma may be more commonly known as a type of bone cancer. However, while chondrosarcoma often starts in the bones, it can also begin in the soft tissue near bones such as the pelvis, hip or shoulder.

 

Chondrosarcoma is typically slow growing and may not present any symptoms, however when it does present symptoms, you might experience one or more of the below listed under the symptoms.

 

Who's most likely to get it?

Chondrosarcoma

People who are 50+ are more likely to be diagnosed with chondrosarcoma, however that does not mean that young people can't be diagnosed with the cancer.

 

Other risk factors include people who have other bone diseases. Some bone diseases can cause benign bone growths, or lumps, that can sometimes turn into chondrosarcoma later in life.

 

Diagnosis & Treatment

 

If a doctor suspects that you may have chondrosarcoma, she will probably order an imaging scan of the suspected area such as an X-ray, MRI or CT scan.

 

If this comes back suspicious, she may take a tissue sample (biopsy) of the area in question to test for cancerous cells. Depending on the area, a biopsy to test for chondrosarcoma can be difficult to do, so make sure that you have a specialist doing the sample.

 

Like most cancers, chondrosarcoma treatment will depend on where the cancer is, how quickly it is growing and if it has spread.

 

The three main treatments for chondrosarcoma are

  • surgery
  • chemotherapy
  • radiation

 

Surgery

 

Surgery for chondrosarcoma can be tricky with the bone. Sometimes the doctors are able to scrape away the cancer cells from the bone and replace the area that has been scrapped away with something called a bone graft or something called bone cement.

 

If scrapping isn't enough to remove the cancer, the surgeon may need to remove part of the affected bone where the cancer is, or remove an entire limb. Depending on how much has been cut away from the surgery, the surgeon may be able to replace or reconstruct the area where the bone has been removed i order to save the limb.

 

Chemotherapy & Radiation

 

While chemotherapy is mentioned as a type of treatment for chondrosarcoma, it is rare that it will be used because most chondrosarcomas are slow growing and do not respond to chemotherapy. However, if you have a rare case in which the chondrosarcoma is fast-growing, chemotherapy will be an encouraged form of treatment.

 

Radiation will most likely be used if your medical team thinks that they are unable to reach the cancer through surgery. Similarly, if the cancer has spread beyond the bone to other areas of the body, the doctor may suggest targeting these areas with radiation to ensure that they remove all cancer from the body.

 

Symptom list:

Chondrosarcoma