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Endometrial Cancer

What's the scoop?

 

Endometrial cancer is a type of gynae cancer that begins in the uterus. The uterus is the part of the female body where a baby develops. The lining of the uterus is called the endometrium, therefore cells that become cancerous there have been called endometrial cancer.

 

Because endometrial cancer makes up for the majority of uterine cancer cases, it is often used interchangeably with the term uterine cancer.

 

What are the types?

 

There are two types of endometrial cancer called

  • endometrioid adenocarcinoma
  • uterine carcinosarcoma

The large majority of diagnosed cases are endometrioid adenocarcinoma.

 

Fortunately, endometrial is usually caught in early stages because the most common symptom of endometrial cancer is unusual bleeding from the vagina.

 

Diagnosis & Treatment

 

There are a few ways to diagnose endometrial cancer. Your doctor might

  • examine your pelvis
  • perform a transvaginal ultrasound
  • use a lighted tube as a scope to examine the inside of the uterus
  • take a sample of uterine tissue

 

Or if they don't get enough tissue to biopsy, they might perform a procedure called a D&C (dilation and curettage).

 

After this, further analysis might be done through different scans whether they be an x-ray, a CT scan or a PET scan.

 

There are many treatment options for endometrial cancer, so it is important to get more than one opinion from a medical professional. In most cases surgery will be recommended to remove the uterus, fallopian tubes (they attach the uterus to the ovaries), and the ovaries.

 

Other options include radiation on its own, chemotherapy paired with hormone therapy (blocks certain hormone cells from developing), targeted therapy (drugs that focus on certain weaknesses in cancer cells), and in some cases, immunotherapy, which is used if the cancer is advanced or isn't responding to the other treatments.

 

What's the scoop?

 

Endometrial cancer is a type of gynae cancer that begins in the uterus. The uterus is the part of the female body where a baby develops. The lining of the uterus is called the endometrium, therefore cells that become cancerous there have been called endometrial cancer.

 

Because endometrial cancer makes up for the majority of uterine cancer cases, it is often used interchangeably with the term uterine cancer.

 

What are the types?

 

There are two types of endometrial cancer called

  • endometrioid adenocarcinoma
  • uterine carcinosarcoma
Graphic representation of Endometrial Cancer

The large majority of diagnosed cases are endometrioid adenocarcinoma.

 

Fortunately, endometrial is usually caught in early stages because the most common symptom of endometrial cancer is unusual bleeding from the vagina.

 

Diagnosis & Treatment

 

There are a few ways to diagnose endometrial cancer. Your doctor might

  • examine your pelvis
  • perform a transvaginal ultrasound
  • use a lighted tube as a scope to examine the inside of the uterus
  • take a sample of uterine tissue

 

Or if they don't get enough tissue to biopsy, they might perform a procedure called a D&C (dilation and curettage).

 

After this, further analysis might be done through different scans whether they be an x-ray, a CT scan or a PET scan.

 

There are many treatment options for endometrial cancer, so it is important to get more than one opinion from a medical professional. In most cases surgery will be recommended to remove the uterus, fallopian tubes (they attach the uterus to the ovaries), and the ovaries.

 

Other options include radiation on its own, chemotherapy paired with hormone therapy (blocks certain hormone cells from developing), targeted therapy (drugs that focus on certain weaknesses in cancer cells), and in some cases, immunotherapy, which is used if the cancer is advanced or isn't responding to the other treatments.

 

Symptom list:

Endometrial Cancer

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Financial support

Not all of us are able to afford the treatment we need. Search your insurance coverage, or check out what charities may be able to offer you for your condition.

p.s. Just because you have insurance, that doesn't mean that charities or other organizations are not able to support you too.

Emotional support

Whether it's a free counseling session or to find someone with a similar diagnosis, these Germie approved charities might be able to help. Click to explore their offerings!

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