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Shin splints

What are Shin Splints?

Shin splints are a common condition that causes pain in the lower part of your legs, specifically along the shinbone. This pain can be felt on the front or inside of the shin. It usually occurs after physical activity, such as running or jumping. Shin splints are often caused by overuse or repetitive stress on the shinbone and the connective tissues that attach muscles to the bone.



Diagnosing Shin Splints

If you experience pain in your shins, especially during or after exercise, it is important to see a healthcare professional for a proper diagnosis. They will examine your legs and ask about your symptoms and activities. In some cases, they may order an X-ray or other imaging tests to rule out other possible causes of your pain. Once shin splints are diagnosed, you can begin appropriate treatment to relieve your discomfort.



Treating Shin Splints

The primary goal of treating shin splints is to reduce pain and inflammation, as well as promote healing. Rest is crucial to allow the injured tissues to heal properly. Applying ice packs to the affected area for 15-20 minutes several times a day can help reduce swelling. Over-the-counter pain relievers, such as ibuprofen, can also provide temporary relief. Physical therapy exercises, such as stretching and strengthening the muscles around the shin, may be recommended to prevent future shin splints.



Preventing Shin Splints

Preventing shin splints involves taking certain precautions during physical activities. It is important to warm up properly before exercising and to gradually increase the intensity and duration of your workouts. Wearing appropriate footwear that provides good support and cushioning can also help prevent shin splints. If you are a runner, consider running on softer surfaces, such as grass or a track, instead of concrete or asphalt. Listening to your body and avoiding overtraining or pushing through pain can also reduce the risk of developing shin splints.



What are Shin Splints?

Shin splints are a common condition that causes pain in the lower part of your legs, specifically along the shinbone. This pain can be felt on the front or inside of the shin. It usually occurs after physical activity, such as running or jumping. Shin splints are often caused by overuse or repetitive stress on the shinbone and the connective tissues that attach muscles to the bone.



Diagnosing Shin Splints

If you experience pain in your shins, especially during or after exercise, it is important to see a healthcare professional for a proper diagnosis. They will examine your legs and ask about your symptoms and activities. In some cases, they may order an X-ray or other imaging tests to rule out other possible causes of your pain. Once shin splints are diagnosed, you can begin appropriate treatment to relieve your discomfort.



Treating Shin Splints

The primary goal of treating shin splints is to reduce pain and inflammation, as well as promote healing. Rest is crucial to allow the injured tissues to heal properly. Applying ice packs to the affected area for 15-20 minutes several times a day can help reduce swelling. Over-the-counter pain relievers, such as ibuprofen, can also provide temporary relief. Physical therapy exercises, such as stretching and strengthening the muscles around the shin, may be recommended to prevent future shin splints.



Preventing Shin Splints

Preventing shin splints involves taking certain precautions during physical activities. It is important to warm up properly before exercising and to gradually increase the intensity and duration of your workouts. Wearing appropriate footwear that provides good support and cushioning can also help prevent shin splints. If you are a runner, consider running on softer surfaces, such as grass or a track, instead of concrete or asphalt. Listening to your body and avoiding overtraining or pushing through pain can also reduce the risk of developing shin splints.



Graphic representation of Shin splints

Symptom list:

Shin splints

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Financial support

Not all of us are able to afford the treatment we need. Search your insurance coverage, or check out what charities may be able to offer you for your condition.

p.s. Just because you have insurance, that doesn't mean that charities or other organizations are not able to support you too.

Emotional support

Whether it's a free counseling session or to find someone with a similar diagnosis, these Germie approved charities might be able to help. Click to explore their offerings!

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Sources:

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