top of page

Stye

What is a Stye?

A stye is a small, red bump that appears on the edge of the eyelid. It can be painful and may cause the eyelid to swell. Styes are usually caused by a bacterial infection in the oil glands of the eyelid. They can occur on the upper or lower eyelid and may affect one or both eyes. Styes are common and can happen to anyone, but they are more common in children and people with certain skin conditions.



Diagnosing a Stye

If you have a red, painful bump on your eyelid, it is likely a stye. Your doctor can diagnose a stye by examining your eyelid and asking about your symptoms. They may also ask about your medical history and any previous eye infections. In some cases, your doctor may recommend further tests to rule out other conditions. It is important to see a doctor if you have a stye that does not improve within a few days or if it gets worse.



Treating a Stye

Most styes can be treated at home without medical intervention. Applying warm compresses to the affected eyelid for 10-15 minutes, several times a day, can help reduce pain and swelling. It is important not to squeeze or pop the stye, as this can spread the infection. If the stye does not improve within a few days or if it becomes more painful, your doctor may prescribe antibiotics or recommend other treatments to help speed up the healing process.



Preventing Styes

There are several preventive measures you can take to reduce the risk of developing a stye. Good hygiene is essential, so make sure to wash your hands regularly and avoid touching your eyes with dirty hands. Avoid sharing towels, pillows, or makeup with others, as this can spread bacteria. If you wear contact lenses, make sure to follow proper hygiene practices and avoid sleeping with your lenses on. It is also important to remove eye makeup before going to bed. If you have recurring styes, your doctor may recommend additional preventive measures or further investigation to identify the underlying cause.



What is a Stye?

A stye is a small, red bump that appears on the edge of the eyelid. It can be painful and may cause the eyelid to swell. Styes are usually caused by a bacterial infection in the oil glands of the eyelid. They can occur on the upper or lower eyelid and may affect one or both eyes. Styes are common and can happen to anyone, but they are more common in children and people with certain skin conditions.



Diagnosing a Stye

If you have a red, painful bump on your eyelid, it is likely a stye. Your doctor can diagnose a stye by examining your eyelid and asking about your symptoms. They may also ask about your medical history and any previous eye infections. In some cases, your doctor may recommend further tests to rule out other conditions. It is important to see a doctor if you have a stye that does not improve within a few days or if it gets worse.



Treating a Stye

Most styes can be treated at home without medical intervention. Applying warm compresses to the affected eyelid for 10-15 minutes, several times a day, can help reduce pain and swelling. It is important not to squeeze or pop the stye, as this can spread the infection. If the stye does not improve within a few days or if it becomes more painful, your doctor may prescribe antibiotics or recommend other treatments to help speed up the healing process.



Preventing Styes

There are several preventive measures you can take to reduce the risk of developing a stye. Good hygiene is essential, so make sure to wash your hands regularly and avoid touching your eyes with dirty hands. Avoid sharing towels, pillows, or makeup with others, as this can spread bacteria. If you wear contact lenses, make sure to follow proper hygiene practices and avoid sleeping with your lenses on. It is also important to remove eye makeup before going to bed. If you have recurring styes, your doctor may recommend additional preventive measures or further investigation to identify the underlying cause.



Graphic representation of Stye

Symptom list:

Stye

piggy-bank.png

Financial support

Not all of us are able to afford the treatment we need. Search your insurance coverage, or check out what charities may be able to offer you for your condition.

p.s. Just because you have insurance, that doesn't mean that charities or other organizations are not able to support you too.

Emotional support

Whether it's a free counseling session or to find someone with a similar diagnosis, these Germie approved charities might be able to help. Click to explore their offerings!

Illustrated%20Waves_edited.jpg

Sources:

bottom of page