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Subdural hematoma

What is a Subdural Hematoma?

A subdural hematoma is a serious condition that occurs when blood collects between the brain and the outermost layer of tissue covering the brain. This can happen after a head injury or trauma, causing blood vessels to rupture and blood to pool in this space. The buildup of blood puts pressure on the brain, which can lead to various symptoms and complications.



Diagnosing a Subdural Hematoma

Diagnosing a subdural hematoma involves a thorough examination by a healthcare professional. They will ask about the patient's medical history and any recent head injuries. A physical examination may be conducted to check for signs such as changes in consciousness, headache, or neurological deficits. Imaging tests, such as a CT scan or MRI, are often used to confirm the presence of a subdural hematoma and determine its severity.



Treatment for Subdural Hematoma

Treatment for a subdural hematoma depends on the severity of the condition. In mild cases, close monitoring may be sufficient, along with pain management and rest. However, more severe cases may require surgical intervention to remove the accumulated blood and relieve pressure on the brain. The specific treatment plan will be determined by a healthcare professional based on the individual's condition and needs.



Preventing Subdural Hematoma

While it may not always be possible to prevent a subdural hematoma, there are some preventive measures that can help reduce the risk. Wearing appropriate protective gear during activities that carry a higher risk of head injuries, such as sports or certain occupations, is crucial. It is also important to take precautions to prevent falls, such as keeping the environment well-lit, using handrails, and removing tripping hazards. Promptly seeking medical attention after a head injury and following healthcare professionals' advice can also contribute to preventing complications like subdural hematomas.



What is a Subdural Hematoma?

A subdural hematoma is a serious condition that occurs when blood collects between the brain and the outermost layer of tissue covering the brain. This can happen after a head injury or trauma, causing blood vessels to rupture and blood to pool in this space. The buildup of blood puts pressure on the brain, which can lead to various symptoms and complications.



Diagnosing a Subdural Hematoma

Diagnosing a subdural hematoma involves a thorough examination by a healthcare professional. They will ask about the patient's medical history and any recent head injuries. A physical examination may be conducted to check for signs such as changes in consciousness, headache, or neurological deficits. Imaging tests, such as a CT scan or MRI, are often used to confirm the presence of a subdural hematoma and determine its severity.



Treatment for Subdural Hematoma

Treatment for a subdural hematoma depends on the severity of the condition. In mild cases, close monitoring may be sufficient, along with pain management and rest. However, more severe cases may require surgical intervention to remove the accumulated blood and relieve pressure on the brain. The specific treatment plan will be determined by a healthcare professional based on the individual's condition and needs.



Preventing Subdural Hematoma

While it may not always be possible to prevent a subdural hematoma, there are some preventive measures that can help reduce the risk. Wearing appropriate protective gear during activities that carry a higher risk of head injuries, such as sports or certain occupations, is crucial. It is also important to take precautions to prevent falls, such as keeping the environment well-lit, using handrails, and removing tripping hazards. Promptly seeking medical attention after a head injury and following healthcare professionals' advice can also contribute to preventing complications like subdural hematomas.



Graphic representation of Subdural hematoma

Symptom list:

Subdural hematoma

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Financial support

Not all of us are able to afford the treatment we need. Search your insurance coverage, or check out what charities may be able to offer you for your condition.

p.s. Just because you have insurance, that doesn't mean that charities or other organizations are not able to support you too.

Emotional support

Whether it's a free counseling session or to find someone with a similar diagnosis, these Germie approved charities might be able to help. Click to explore their offerings!

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Sources:

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