Acute myelogenous leukemia

Talk to me.

 

Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is one of the most common types of leukemia in adults, however across all types of cancers it only makes up 1% of those diagnosed in the United States.

 

AML is a type of cancer that affects the blood and bone marrow, or the spongey area inside the bones where blood cells are formed. AML gets its name because myelogenous refers to its affect on a group of white blood cells called myeloid cells.

 

As cancer diagnoses and terminology is quite confusing and overwhelming, it's important to note that AML can also be called the following things:

  • acute myeloid leukemia
  • acute myeloblastic leukemia
  • acute granulocytic leukemia
  • acute nonlymphocytic leukemia

 

Who's most at risk?

 

The most common age at diagnosis is 65 years old and the disease is more likely to occur in men than in women. The risk factors that have been identified with AML include

  • radiation or chemotherapy from previous illnesses, radiation from nuclear exposure
  • exposure to chemicals
  • smoking
  • certain blood disorders
  • some genetic disorders and retroviruses, such as HIV.

 

Diagnosis & Treatment

 

 

Talk to me.

 

Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is one of the most common types of leukemia in adults, however across all types of cancers it only makes up 1% of those diagnosed in the United States.

 

AML is a type of cancer that affects the blood and bone marrow, or the spongey area inside the bones where blood cells are formed. AML gets its name because myelogenous refers to its affect on a group of white blood cells called myeloid cells.

 

As cancer diagnoses and terminology is quite confusing and overwhelming, it's important to note that AML can also be called the following things:

Acute myelogenous leukemia
  • acute myeloid leukemia
  • acute myeloblastic leukemia
  • acute granulocytic leukemia
  • acute nonlymphocytic leukemia

 

Who's most at risk?

 

The most common age at diagnosis is 65 years old and the disease is more likely to occur in men than in women. The risk factors that have been identified with AML include

  • radiation or chemotherapy from previous illnesses, radiation from nuclear exposure
  • exposure to chemicals
  • smoking
  • certain blood disorders
  • some genetic disorders and retroviruses, such as HIV.

 

Diagnosis & Treatment

 

 

Symptom list:

Acute myelogenous leukemia