Anal Cancer

What's the scoop?

 

Anal cancer is cancer of the anal canal, which is the area connected to the end of the rectum where waste comes out of the butthole. It is uncommon and affects around 8,000 people in the United States each year.

 

Who's most at risk? women.

 

While there are multiple types of anal cancer, most cases are connected to HPV, or the human papillomavirus. Because of this, anal cancer is more common in women than it is in men.

Are there different types?

 

The main types of anal cancer are

  • carcinoma in situ (Bowens disease)
  • squamous cell cancer (carcinoma)
  • adenocarcinomas
  • skin cancers such as basal cell and melanoma when found in later stages

 

Are there preventable risks?

 

There are also specific risk factors for anal cancer that can increase your risk in developing anal cancer which are

  • having many sexual partners
  • having anal sex
  • smoking
  • immune suppressing drugs
  • HIV.

 

Also, there are some genetic links to anal cancer, so for those who have had vulvar or cervical cancer may be more prone to anal cancer as well.

 

Treatment

 

To treat anal cancer, usually a combination of radiation and chemotherapy will be used. In some cases IMRT (intensity modulated radiation therapy) can be used. This is where the radiation directly targets the area where the cancer is and spares the surrounding healthy cells.

 

Surgery might be used to treat anal cancer as well. There are two main types of surgery: local and more invasive.

 

Surgery that can be done locally involves the tumor and tissue around being removed from the anal canal. For surgery that is more invasive, the doctor may do an abdominoperineal resection known as an APR. An APR (also called a colostomy) is a surgery in which more of the digestive tract is removed, including the

  • anus
  • rectum
  • parts of the bowel

 

Because of the organs that are removed, the end of the intestine will be attached to a stoma bag.

 

Stoma bags can be both emotionally and physically tough for some people, so if you are having this surgery, it is recommended to use the many resources online on how to cope with stoma bags as well as how to connect to many helpful communities.

 

What's the scoop?

 

Anal cancer is cancer of the anal canal, which is the area connected to the end of the rectum where waste comes out of the butthole. It is uncommon and affects around 8,000 people in the United States each year.

 

Who's most at risk? women.

 

While there are multiple types of anal cancer, most cases are connected to HPV, or the human papillomavirus. Because of this, anal cancer is more common in women than it is in men.

Anal Cancer

Are there different types?

 

The main types of anal cancer are

  • carcinoma in situ (Bowens disease)
  • squamous cell cancer (carcinoma)
  • adenocarcinomas
  • skin cancers such as basal cell and melanoma when found in later stages

 

Are there preventable risks?

 

There are also specific risk factors for anal cancer that can increase your risk in developing anal cancer which are

  • having many sexual partners
  • having anal sex
  • smoking
  • immune suppressing drugs
  • HIV.

 

Also, there are some genetic links to anal cancer, so for those who have had vulvar or cervical cancer may be more prone to anal cancer as well.

 

Treatment

 

To treat anal cancer, usually a combination of radiation and chemotherapy will be used. In some cases IMRT (intensity modulated radiation therapy) can be used. This is where the radiation directly targets the area where the cancer is and spares the surrounding healthy cells.

 

Surgery might be used to treat anal cancer as well. There are two main types of surgery: local and more invasive.

 

Surgery that can be done locally involves the tumor and tissue around being removed from the anal canal. For surgery that is more invasive, the doctor may do an abdominoperineal resection known as an APR. An APR (also called a colostomy) is a surgery in which more of the digestive tract is removed, including the

  • anus
  • rectum
  • parts of the bowel

 

Because of the organs that are removed, the end of the intestine will be attached to a stoma bag.

 

Stoma bags can be both emotionally and physically tough for some people, so if you are having this surgery, it is recommended to use the many resources online on how to cope with stoma bags as well as how to connect to many helpful communities.

 

Symptom list:

Anal Cancer