Targeted Therapy

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Targeted therapy is a type of therapy used to find cancer that can either stop or slow the growth of cancer cells. How the targeted therapy is able to slow the growth depends on the specific therapy.

 

Cancer cells need specific proteins or other types of molecules in order to survive and grow which can either be made by specific genes in the body or the cancer cells themselves. With targeted drug therapy, doctors are able to block these proteins or genes which in turn will slow the growth of more cancer cells.

 

What's the treatment process?

 

To start targeted drug therapy, the doctor may run some tests to determine if they think targeted drug therapy will be successful with your case.

Targeted drug therapy is similar to chemotherapy in that it can be taken orally through a pill or intravenously through a vein.

 

There are two main types of targeted therapy based on how the therapy reaches the molecules.

  • small molecule drugs
  • monoclonal antibodies

 

Small molecule drugs will reach the molecule inside the cancer cells, while monoclonal antibodies reach molecules on the outside of the cancer cells.

 

Is there anything else I should know?

 

Targeted drug therapy can come with side effects like most other cancer treatments which are important to watch out for and manage. These include

  • skin trouble such as hives or intense itching
  • diarrhea
  • constipation
  • nausea and vomiting
  • fatigue
  • allergic reactions
  • high liver enzymes
  • low blood cell volumes
  • high blood pressure
  • trouble with the blood's ablity to clot (wounds may not heal easily)

 

Talk to your doctor if you're experiencing any of the above and they can talk to you about things that may alleviate your side effects.

 

Talk to me.

 

Targeted therapy is a type of therapy used to find cancer that can either stop or slow the growth of cancer cells. How the targeted therapy is able to slow the growth depends on the specific therapy.

 

Cancer cells need specific proteins or other types of molecules in order to survive and grow which can either be made by specific genes in the body or the cancer cells themselves. With targeted drug therapy, doctors are able to block these proteins or genes which in turn will slow the growth of more cancer cells.

 

What's the treatment process?

 

To start targeted drug therapy, the doctor may run some tests to determine if they think targeted drug therapy will be successful with your case.

Targeted Therapy

Targeted drug therapy is similar to chemotherapy in that it can be taken orally through a pill or intravenously through a vein.

 

There are two main types of targeted therapy based on how the therapy reaches the molecules.

  • small molecule drugs
  • monoclonal antibodies

 

Small molecule drugs will reach the molecule inside the cancer cells, while monoclonal antibodies reach molecules on the outside of the cancer cells.

 

Is there anything else I should know?

 

Targeted drug therapy can come with side effects like most other cancer treatments which are important to watch out for and manage. These include

  • skin trouble such as hives or intense itching
  • diarrhea
  • constipation
  • nausea and vomiting
  • fatigue
  • allergic reactions
  • high liver enzymes
  • low blood cell volumes
  • high blood pressure
  • trouble with the blood's ablity to clot (wounds may not heal easily)

 

Talk to your doctor if you're experiencing any of the above and they can talk to you about things that may alleviate your side effects.

 

Symptom list:

Targeted Therapy